Why zhōng zhuā bǐng (餅) is called a “grab” pancake.

Zhōng zhuā bǐng (蔥抓餅), directly translated “scallion ‘grab’ pancake,” is a buttery, flaky Taiwanese breakfast street food. It is often pan fried with egg and topped with a chili sauce.
Zhōng zhuā bǐng (蔥抓餅), directly translated “scallion ‘grab’ pancake,” is a buttery, flaky Taiwanese breakfast street food. It is often pan fried with egg and topped with a chili sauce.
Zhōng zhuā bǐng (蔥抓餅), directly translated “scallion ‘grab’ pancake,” is a buttery, flaky Taiwanese breakfast street food. It is often pan fried with egg and topped with a chili sauce.

Zhōng zhuā bǐng (餅), directly translated “scallion ‘grab’ pancake,” is a buttery, flaky Taiwanese breakfast street food. It is often pan fried with egg and topped with a chili sauce.

Sichuan peppercorns, the ingredient that gives our dan dan noodles their “buzzy” taste, were banned by the USDA from 1968 to 2005 because of a canker virus they carry. They’re legal again here, as long as they’re heated to about 160 degrees F before they’re imported. Local food scientist Harold McGee once described them as creating “the feeling of a mild electrical current (similar to touching the terminals of a nine-volt battery to the tongue).” We don’t recommend a compare and contrast. But you can get yourself to the market today for a tasting. We’ve kept our dan dan sauce somewhat mild mannered, but if you want to up the battery charge, take a spoonful of the Sichuan peppercorn-chili oil that we put out on the table.

Sichuan peppercorns, the ingredient that gives our dan dan noodles their “buzzy” taste, were banned by the USDA from 1968 to 2005 because of a canker virus they carry. They’re legal again here, as long as they’re heated to about 160 degrees F before they’re imported. Local food scientist Harold McGee once described them as creating “the feeling of a mild electrical current (similar to touching the terminals of a nine-volt battery to the tongue).” We don’t recommend a compare and contrast. But you can get yourself to the market today for a tasting. We’ve kept our dan dan sauce somewhat mild mannered, but if you want to up the battery charge, take a spoonful of the Sichuan peppercorn-chili oil that we put out on the table.